How to Buy a Skateboard

The world keeps coming up with new ways of entertainment and enjoyment. The skateboard is one of the more recent additions to the fascination of the youth of the 21st Century. Most adolescents fall in…

The world keeps coming up with new ways of entertainment and enjoyment. The skateboard is one of the more recent additions to the fascination of the youth of the 21st Century. Most adolescents fall in love with a skateboard after watching the pros in action. The skateboarding is indeed very attractive to all young people because it is daring, it is creative and it definitely is full of action.

As soon as you find yourself in love with this new sport, you would definitely look forward to buy a skateboard for yourself. Most likely you would have a few friends along with you who would be able to guide you in how to buy a skateboard. In case you do not, there following few lines would be helpful since you would find here a mini guide of sorts:

1. Be ready for the cost – a skateboard – a quality skateboard – does not come cheap; and remember, cheap skateboard have no quality. Hence, if you want to have a good head start in this sport, be ready to loosen your purse strings and pay what it takes to get a good quality skateboard. You should expect it to cost something around US $100 for a decent board.

2. Choosing your deck – the best choice here would be one without any logos or graphics, as these are usually coming from designer labels and accordingly the cost would be multiplied accordingly. As it is the designs would fade away pretty soon owing to the fact that a decent amount of skateboarding would scratch it off soon enough. You should buy 7 ply or 9 ply deck for best results (this means that there are 7 or 9 layers of ply respectively) and pay close attention to its shape. A good skateboard should be decently curved in the kicktails.

3. Pay Attention to the Trucks – this is a very important trait for the beginners. Pay close attention to the trucks. If these are not f good quality your skateboard would go for a toss the first time you really try something serious. Beware of the cheap imitation of skateboards. Always buy from reputed retail outlets after closely verifying the details.

4. The Importance of Bearings and Wheels – the bearing are very important in the way you would be able to master your skateboard. The speed of your skateboard is measured by a specific value – called the ABEC value. This lowest measurement here is the AA value – which indicates that the skateboard can hardly pull itself along. The minimum best would be ABEC 3 and it goes on with 5, 7 and 9. For a beginner the best would be to start with ABEC 3 (or maximum 5). This would ensure that the skateboard is free enough for you to practice some early tricks, while it would slow enough not to literally slip off from under your feet.

5. New Vs Used skateboards – though a new skateboard would be the best choice for everyone, sometimes it would be good if you buy one from a pro. The used and ‘broken-in’ skateboard would not only be available at a bargain priceBusiness Management Articles, but also be excellent for you to practice on.

What Every Exercise-Hater Must Know about Marathon Walking

Marathons are no longer reserved for elite runners. Increasingly, more and more people are walking marathons. It’s a great sport for older people, former couch potatoes, and people who never thought of themselves as athletic. Marathon walkers face some of the same training challenges as marathon runners, but they also have some unique obstacles as well. For the persistent, however, it’s a great sport.

The word marathon is meant to inspire terror. It’s a 26.2 mile run that takes even super athletes hours to complete. You can’t just sign up and do a marathon. You have to train rigorously to even have a hope of finishing. So why do some people think this is fun?

Yet a growing movement is occurring around the world that allows more and more people the opportunity to participate in marathons and other races by walking and not running. Walking is a much lower stress activity than running or even jogging.

People of all ages can walk marathons, even older people and people who are not athletic or very fit when they start out. And who wouldn’t benefit from the health advantages of long-term marathon training.

And mile for mile, walking burns the same calories as running. So why don’t more people walk marathons?

First, not all marathons are open to walkers and some permit walkers but do not officially encourage them. Marathons that invite walkers are sometimes advertised as “walker friendly.” (Not all of them are!)

The biggest concern for marathon walkers who participate in official races is how long the track is open. A top runner completes a marathon in slightly over two hours. Most reasonably good athletes can do a marathon in four hours. Even slower runners can complete a marathon in five or six hours. (A six-hour marathon time means the runner ran 13 minute miles … not exactly a super-fast time!) However, walkers need six to eight hours to complete a marathon. Walking consistent 15-minute miles, it would take a little over six-and-a-half hours to walk a marathon. Factor in some bathroom breaks, inconsistent performance, or slower walking times and you end up with marathon walkers who turn in times of seven or eight hours.

Most marathons keep the track open six hours. After that, they begin to “sweep” or start at the beginning of the track and pick up stragglers, the injured, and the clean up the mess at water stations.

While walkers can dodge the sweepers for a while, eventually the walkers will be compelled to leave the track and the marathon unfinished.

The Los Angeles Marathon is known for being super-friendly to walkers because the track is open long enough for even slow walkers to complete the race before getting “swept up.”

In some ways, walkers face the same training challenges as runners. It takes consistent training over a period of many months to build up the stamina and technique required to go 26.2 miles at once.

Training programs for walkers tend to be sporadic and are not always offered in groups training to enter a marathon. When walking programs are available, there may be only a few participants and no real experts at walking technique.

Marathon walkers also face their own unique challenges. Although a very fast elite walker can actually out-pace a slow runner, most walkers are on the track and exercising longer than the runners. That means they need to allow extra time, extra hydration and even some food. It is not unusual for marathon walkers to bring along packets of bars, gels, or liquids to take in along the way. Bathroom breaks are also more necessary during a six or seven hour period of exercise than for those who can do the course in much shorter times.

The best training program for walkers involves consistent training over a period of about six months or more before the race.

Every week, the walker should go out four times in “maintenance walks” that start out at 30 minutes and gradually extend to full hours. Once a week, there should be a “long walk.” This can start out at 15 or 30 minutes; the walker should add 15 minutes more each week until the walk is about 1 hour and 45 minutes long.

During these initial weeks, walkers should learn good form and technique and only concentrate on time, not speed or distance. Obviously, it’s a good idea to gradually try to improve speed, but the main focus is doing the time.

After 1 hour and 45 minutes, it’s time to switch over to distance. At this point, long walks are measured in miles, starting with 6 miles and adding a mile a week until the walks get up to 10 or 11 miles.

At this point, marathon walkers should defer to training manuals for marathon runners. A very crucial skill that marathoners must learn is how to add six more miles to the distance. This means one week the long walk is 10 miles, the next week it’s 16. The following week it’s back to 10, then the next week to 11, and then it’s 17 miles.

This sort of pattern builds up a vitally important marathon skill: the ability to go six more miles, no matter what.

Once the long walk hits 20 miles, that’s an important marker in training. No long walk during training should ever exceed 20 miles. However, before taking on a race, a marathon walker should have done at least three long walks of 20 miles.

A few weeks before the actual race, training ramps down. Walks get shorter. While the walker maintains a consistent schedule of four hour-long, fairly fast maintenance walks a week, the “long walks” dwindle down to a mere 10 or 12 miles.

On race day, the newbie marathon walker faces his or her first 26.2 mile walk. But he or she has learned two vital skills: the ability to go 20 miles with confidence and the ability to be able to go six more miles no matter what. The last 0.2 miles that makes up the marathon is run on adrenalin and crowd noise. To be able to participate in a marathon, a training schedule should be set up to map onto race day. Once a marathon walker is fully in training, he or she can easily modify the schedule to accommodate other races during the year. In fact, many people get so addicted to marathon walking that they do fourFeature Articles, five or more races a year.

The Thrill of Trout Fishing

The thrill of trout fishing! It is the best, isn’t it? No matter where you plan to go trout fishing, you know you are more than likely going to enjoy your trip. The sport is a sport of its own, set aside from other types of fishing. Some believe trout fishing is the most difficult of any type of fishing. Regardless of if you believe this or not, there are many reasons to love trout fishing.

To begin with, trout fishing is all about being smarter than the fish! You need to know how that fish is going to react long before it does. How do you know this and do this? For one, you need to know about the animal itself. Trout are very smart animals. They know that they are prey, so they will avoid anything they think is going to harm them. So, you, the fisherman, need to be smarter and catch the trout unaware. That is why when you are trout fishing, you will more then likely cast from quite a distance. Trout come up to the surface to feed. If they lay their eyes on you, they are gone. No hope of catching it. Instead, casting from a distance is important to keep you out of the picture.

Trout fishing is also a demanding sport because it takes knowledge. It’s not enough to know about how the trout react, but you have to know what equipment you need. When you go to your local sporting goods stores or tackle shop, you will find that there is often a large line of products designed for trout fishing. The lure that you use will need to be something that will enter the water unnoticeable and without causing a splash. The trout fishing line you use will need to be pretty much clear, but strong. There is much more equipment specific things you can invest in to help you with your trout fishing. Simply look around the store to see what jumps out at you!

Some of the best things about trout fishing are the trips you can enjoy. You can plan a trout fishing trip to last a day, a weekend, or a week. You can book your trout fishing trip to be in a nearby lake or river. But, think about booking a trout fishing trip out of the country! If not, perhaps you would like to consider an out of state trout fishing trip. Not only are these the best ways to enjoy the sport and all types of trout fishing, but you get to see some of the most beautiful places in the world!

It goes without saying that trout fishing is one of the best sports out there. If you are a beginner looking to learn, the best knowledge you can obtain is experience. Yes, you can purchase all that equipment, but nothing will teach and help you more then experience in trout fishing